20 April 2012

That Tudor Thing on Fifth


What's with the Tudor fever dream at 581 Fifth Avenue near 47th Street? The one that looks like it may have been the birthplace of Shakespeare's father, but has the incongruously junky souvenir shop in the base? Best of Scotland used to be located here. That may explain the design scheme. But it probably doesn't. Anyone know?

6 comments:

r185 said...

I have a vague recollection of it being some sort of Swiss travel office at one point.

Ken Sacharin said...

Current Building Built 1930. Before that,the second floor was the location of Joseph Urban's art gallery in the 1920's (Weiner Werkstatte; they sold paintings by Gustav Klimt, among others). Before that, Youman's Hatters. And before that, the house of Dr. Morris Henry (from at least the 1880's to the early 1900's.) I'd like to know more about the Tudor schtick too though.

Francis said...

It was a haberdasher called Finchley's. The Tudor style was one of the most popular of that era, partly because of its association with sophisticated suburban living (e.g., Forest Hills). Think Tudor City or any number of other apartment buildings or subdivisions of the time. And occasionally the style made its way to commercial buildings as well.

Brooks of Sheffield said...

Thanks for all the info, guys.

mingusal said...

You have the address wrong. It's 564 Fifth.

The building was indeed designed for the Finchley menswear store, and built in 1924. The architect was Beverly S. King, who designed or co-designed a number of other buildings around the city, including the recently landmarked Engineers Club on W. 40th St., and, in similar style to 564 Fifth, the marvelous little Pomander Walk on the Upper West Side.

Tom Miller said...

The history of Finchley's Castle ca be seen here: http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2012/11/finchleys-castle-nos-564-568-5th-avenue.html